Tips for Getting Started with Online Teaching

Even for schools that don’t see themselves as “online” institutions, there are ways to gradually get started teaching online courses. In this video, Dann Hurlbert of Carleton College’s Academic Technology walks viewers through some research on and tips for getting started.

Special Thanks to Yiwen Lou for her work on this video.

Academic Technology at OLC Innovate 2018!

Andrew, Dann, and Janet presented at the Online Learning Consortium Innovate! Conference in Nashville.  Their talks were (respectively):

Dann’s notes from sessions he attended are summarized below:

Planning, Producing, and Evaluating Effective Instructional Videos

UPDATE 4/13/18: 

Thanks to everyone who’s taken this instructional video quiz so far! (Already over 100 of you!)

quiz results displayed in horizontal bar graph showing anonymous results. most respondents got 3 or more questions right out of 4.

Here’s a screenshot of what the analytics look like. You can see how people responded by question, AND, when users are actually logging into the software, you can track how each individual person responds. For this, everyone shows up as unauthenticated–but that’s OK, since I’m not actually assigning you a grade. 🙂 If you still want to take the quiz, here’s the link: https://carleton.yuja.com/V/VideoPoll/1909


Ever wonder what your students are actually learning when watching your instructional videos?  There are lots of ways to assess learning with video, and I wanted you to see this fun and SHORT — 60 second — video before my presentation in at OLC Nashville! I’ll be discussing Planning, Producing, and Evaluating Effective Instructional Videos. On that note, I’d love to have you check-out this “video quiz” that lets instructors see what their students learn while watching the video.  It’s one of many assessment tools available to us in education nowadays.  (And yes, I used a Little Prompter to ensure my own flawless delivery in the video. : )  Long to short, I’d be thrilled if you watched it and answered the four SHORT questions. I’m tracking analytics, and am interested to see how your answers look when compiled with lots of others. Feel free to share this post, too!   Just click the following link, below, to jump to the video, and for those attending OLC in Nashville, we can checkout the results together!  Thanks!

https://carleton.yuja.com/V/VideoPoll/1909

Janet’s Spring 2018 Update

This Spring Term online teaching and learning is much on my mind.

I’ll be presenting at OLCInnovate 2018 in Nashville, Tennessee this April. OLC, Online Learning Consortium, pairs up with MERLOT (for those of you who remember this repository) for their big conferences. I’ve got a couple presentations but for this update I’m focused on the one titled “Is online teaching and learning relevant for small residential liberal arts colleges?” It’s in the session category ‘Conversations, Not Presentations’ which means I get to talk with attendees rather than at them and I’m hopeful for some interesting and useful conversation.

For the OLC conversation I’ll be pulling from my Carleton work with CUBE, Carleton Undergraduate Bridge Experience. CUBE consists of an online 6 week summer portion and a traditional Fall Term portion. Summer CUBE has two primary goals: 1) to strengthen the quantitative skills of incoming students and 2) to connect participants to the campus community before they arrive on campus.

CUBE in turn has heavily contributed to Carleton’s LACOL (Liberal Arts Consortium for Online Learning) work on the QLAB project and this will inform my OLC conversation as well. QLAB is the nickname applied to a multi-campus development and educational research initiative to assist our students with readiness for their quantitative work across the curriculum, and to investigate the role that online resources may play in this.

And all of this online teaching and learning work at Carleton is going easier for me because of my time at Georgetown University which was  just prior to coming to Carleton. There, in my position as Director of Technology Enhanced Learning, I helped design and implement online courses and MOOCs, and in my position as adjunct professor, I taught an online course.

I won’t rely on my experiences alone though to pull off a good conversation at OLC! I’ll be tracking the current buzz about online T&L and that includes a few folks even talking about it in the context of small liberal arts schools:

Reflecting on the Original Big Idea for MOOC’s

Is online education good or bad? And is that really the right question?

Can Online Teaching Work at Liberal-Arts Colleges? Study Explores the Pros and Cons.

Wish me luck!

Andrew’s Spring 2018 Update

Fall and winter terms were an exciting time for me, with the arrival of our new 3D printer and the in-class trial of one of my Augmented Reality (AR) applications. Spring term will be just as exciting but a bit more virtual for me, as I will be spending time developing virtual experiences for Psychology and making virtual proteins a reality.

Spring term will also see more development and another full trial of our Biochemistry AR application. Working together with Rou-Jia Sung, we will be developing additional modules for use within the Intro to Biochemistry course this term. On this front, we will also be applying for a NSF grant to fund further research into the use of AR within a classroom setting. Excitingly, the AR application will be presented twice this term at the Online Learning Consortium (OLC) in Nashville and at the Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER).

Spring will also be an exciting time for me personally. Now I am settled in Carleton, and having worked with the wonderful librarians, I am about to embark on writing my third book Visualizations in Cultural Heritage. The book will look at the history and development of the multitude of visualizations employed within the Cultural Heritage field.