Tutee or Not Tutee: Who should be on camera in your Instructional Video?

Effective instructional videos can vary in style.  This short video, inspired by an Arizona State University study, reveals preferences and effectiveness in two different styles:

  1. Should you teach to the camera/viewer or
  2. Should you teach a student who is also on camera and film that interaction?

This video featuring Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru succinctly recaps a 2018 study from ASU’s Katelyn M Cooper, Lu Ding, Michelle Stephens, Michelene T. H. Chi, and Sara E Brownell.

Facing Instructional Videos

How important is it for instructors to include their own faces when creating instructional videos? The answer might surprise you. Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru (and an actor, director, and inventor of the Little Prompter) leans on research and his own expertise to offer guidance.

Instructional Video Workshops Fill up Fast!

I’m already excited to be a part of the team hosting this Instructional Video Workshop at Carleton in late July!  Attendees will not only take-way a concrete and replicable process for creating process, but they’ll create [at least] 3 Instructional Videos they can start using right away.  The seats filled-up so fast, there is no doubt we’ll be doing more of these in the future!  More information on the workshop itself is available here.  And if you’d like to be notified when we host another one, please complete this short form. — dann


Business Video Benefits (in Education)

Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media and Design Guru provides an overview of Matt Bowman’s article in Forbes Magazine about video marketing in business. There is a reason businesses are using more video:  it’s working. It can work well in education, too. Take a moment to reflect on Matt’s article — and nibble on the possibilities video can provide educators by watching this:

Recap: Day of DH 2018

3 scholars seated on high chairs with microphones smiling and laughing during discussion.

Image caption: (l-r) Thabiti Willis, Jack Gieseking, Adriana Estill in conversation. Photo by Briannon Carlsen.

 

Guest Post: Arduino Water Depth Monitor

Author: Nathan Mannes, ’19

With supplies from the Geology Department and with the advising of Andrew Wilson, we have created an Arduino-based water-depth monitor. The grey cone you see at the bottom of the photo is a sonar-device that measures how far the closest solid object in front of it is. That could mean a wall, but we intend to put it over a body of water, like Lyman Lakes, to measure its depth over a long period of time with little maintenance. Because it is solar powered, we can leave it outside and let it send readings on its own.

On the right side you see a 3G shield module (with the antennae) mounted on an Arduino. It uses mobile data to send readings over the internet. But it has to send data to somewhere, right? We are setting up a public-facing webserver so that we can keep track of this data long-term. Then, much like the water tower, we will always be able to check what the depth of the Lyman Lakes are. In the future, we intend to expand this to conduct other readings on the water, like its pH or temperature, or volume of flow.

Carly Born Presents at CALICO 2018!

Carly presents at the Computer-Assisted Language Instruction Consortium (CALICO) 2018’s Technology Showcase on Language Lesson for Speaking Exercises on Thursday, May 31!

Abstract:

Language Lesson is a stand-alone tool designed to facilitate student recording exericses, such as elicited imitation tasks, scaffolded dialog practice or fluency exercises. This tool allows instructors to leave text or oral feedback for students at specific points in student recordings, providing contextualized corrective feedback on students’ speaking. In our current research we are investigating Natural Language Processing technology to faciliate evaluation of student recordings for placement or proficiency assessments. Language Lesson will be released as an open-source project in the Summer of 2018.

Tips for Getting Started with Online Teaching

Even for schools that don’t see themselves as “online” institutions, there are ways to gradually get started teaching online courses. In this video, Dann Hurlbert of Carleton College’s Academic Technology walks viewers through some research on and tips for getting started.

Special Thanks to Yiwen Lou for her work on this video.

Civic Engagement, Spanish Classes, and Instructional Video

Dann Hurlbert and Palmar Alvarez-Blanco co-taught Spanish 206, a Carleton College course focused on fostering civic engagement–while giving back to the community. Students in this course worked with under-represented community organizations to help them spread their message by creating a participatory video with them. In addition to using video creation as coursework and as the assessment, Dann also uses Instructional Video to teach and guide the learning. This sample video includes short selections from the following films: Bacon and God’s Wrath by Sol Friedman and Sarah Clifford-Rashotte; Godka Circa by Antonio Tibaldi and Alex Lora; Damon at 86th Street by Emily Sheskin, and the Price of Certainty by Daniele Anastasion.