Testing the Guide to Set Up WordPress Locally with WAMP

A local server environment will make testing themes and plugins of WordPress much easier. One of the ways to achieve this to install WAMP on your PC. I found this great blog post titled How to Set Up WordPress Locally for PC/Windows with WampServer by Raelene Morey. I installed WAMP on my PC and set up WordPress following this guide. Here is a summary of what I did and found, including a few details which are emitted from the guide.

Install WAMP on your PC

  • Go to http://www.wampserver.com/en/
  • Choose the version that matches up with your system
    • You may be unsure about downloading the 64 bits or the 32 bits version. You can check your system type by typing “System” in the search box. Look for the “System Type” field which tell you if your system is x64 or x32.
  • Click “download directly”
  • Follow the installation instructions

Set-up Wordpress on WAMP (things emitted from the guide)

  1. Before downloading WordPress, you need to set up a database first. This requires you to login to phpMyAdmin. You don’t actually need to enter the username nor password in order to login. If clicking “Go” button doesn’t lead you to a new page, try entering “root” as the username and leave the password field blank. 
  2. When you’ve downloaded WordPress following the guide, you’ll need to tweak the wp-config-sample.php file. To edit the .php file, you’ll need a text editor. The one I used was notepad++. You can also try TextWrangler, Brackets and other text editors. (Here is a list of options.) After downloading notepad++ from here, you can right click the .php file and choose “Edit with notepad++”. Here’s how the .php file looked in notepad++ before and after edited.  (before)  (after)

 

Test WordPress Plugin (Juxtapose) on WAMP

  1. Go to http://localhost/wordpress/ in your WAMP server. Login to your WordPress account.
  2. Search for plugins that you’d like to test.  I chose Juxtapose for this experiment.
  3. Upload images to be juxtaposed to “Media” first. Then in your blog post or wherever you’d like to use this feature, paste in this shortcode –  [juxtapose]<image1><image2>[/juxtapose]. Replace “<image1><image2>” by inserting the images you’d like to be juxtaposed.
  4. Results: now you can compare the two images by sliding the vertical bar. Images of different dimensions may not work as expected. This plugin also works for pairs of images of any size, except thumbnails.

 

Time Management, or the Eternal Struggle

It is no secret to anyone who has spent any amount of time at Carleton that life here is busy. Classes, workstudy, sports, rehearsals, volunteering, research and occasional sleep combine in elaborate ways which can make anyone dizzy and make planning ahead and keeping track of all the commitments almost impossible. I remember thinking when I was applying to be a DHA last year: “This job is so awesome! I get to schedule my own hours – that means I can just work on the projects whenever I have free time”. I was only partially right. The job is indeed awesome, except there is no free time. As weeks go by, the term gradually turns into an avaricious time-sucking wormhole – and finding time to work becomes a struggle, sometimes (almost) making me wish I had a set schedule.

My job as a DHA made me realize how inept I am at organizing my time. I can finally feel that I’m slowly but steadily getting better. Here’s what I’ve learned (by many a trial and many an error):

  • Having a planner is very useful and marking the hours I expect to have to work on DH projects at the beginning of each week definitely helps.
  • Even though there are no official hours, it’s good to set hours for myself as if there were, and adhere to the schedule as much as possible – if there’s a conflict in my schedule for that week, I can deviate from it.
  • Project logs are great! Better still if they are detailed and well-written. It has happened to me many times that I would jot down a quick note to myself about what I still need to do for a project or think that it’s so obvious that writing anything down is completely unnecessary. Unsurprisingly, next time I sat down to work on the project I’d be totally lost because I would no longer remember my own thought process. So yes, write down as much as possible.
  • Try not to put off until tomorrow what can be done today. Sounds simple but is surprisingly effective.

In this way my work as a DHA has inspired me to start an uphill battle with absent-mindedness and procrastination. It will be a long and tough one. But I have hope.

Knowing That I Don’t Know: Asking Questions

As I near the end of my second term as a DHA, it is a good time to reflect on what I’ve learned from this experience so far. Since starting in September, I have learned, been exposed to, and experimented with a number of digital tools. Although the major tool I have been using in my work is ArcGIS, being part of the DHA team and Team Workhouse means that I learn more every week from the work other team members have been doing. However, perhaps more importantly than learning digital tools, I have learned the importance of communication and asking questions.

For teams like the DHAs and Team Workhouse, communication is crucial. Just like the game objects in Bard’s Unity project that needed to share information in order to function, people on teams also need to share information in order to function smoothly. Uncertainty about who is doing what is not efficient or productive for teams. A particularly important part of communication is asking questions. While I have learned a lot about digital tools these last two terms, I know that there is a lot that I still don’t know. While sometimes it can be productive to struggle through uncertainty to figure something out, other times the process can be greatly improved by a quick meeting or email exchange.

One example of this was when I was helping to migrate our website to a new page (you can see our current website here!). In particular, I was struggling with moving media (especially videos) over to the new site. I spent time looking through Reason’s documentation and trying to figure it out myself, but made very little progress on my problem. Finally, I talked to Doug Bratland, Web Content Specialist, part of Carleton’s Web Services Group. He was incredibly helpful and in just a half hour was able to fix the problems I had been working on. Not only did he solve the problems I was having, but he also took time to explain why I had been running into problems and make sure that I understood what he did to solve them. I came away from that meeting with not just solutions to the website issues, but also a deeper understanding of how Reason CMS works. If I had not asked for help and questions about the problems I had with the website, not only would it have taken much longer to fix, but I wouldn’t have learned as much about how it works. Although just one example from my two terms as a DHA, it nevertheless illustrates the importance of asking questions about things I don’t know. And although I have learned a lot about digital tools in the past two terms, there is still a lot I don’t know. So, I will need to keep asking questions.

How To Do Your Job When You Don’t Know How To Do Your Job

The cool thing about this job is that I get to constantly be doing new things and jumping into new projects. The flip side to this, however, is that each project is unique and requires very different skills – skills that I (very often? most of the time?) don’t yet have. So this term, I’ve been getting used to the fact that not having a skill to do a certain job doesn’t mean I don’t do the job, it means I get to learn how to do it. The question then often becomes, “Where do I even start to learn how to do X?” The following are some tips and tactics I’ve been working on using when I’m faced with a daunting task that I’ve never done before:

  • Just ask. This seems obvious, but it’s often much easier said than done. People don’t want to risk sounding dumb by asking questions, but 1) people probably won’t actually think you’re dumb, and 2) isn’t it better to ask and learn how to do something correctly than spend all your time doing it wrong?
  • Google it, but be smart about it. Again, this seems obvious, but Google is a gift and a curse. Be wary of bad advice (you wouldn’t cite a Buzzfeed article for an academic paper, so why should you take serious advice from it?), and think hard about the search terms you use (be precise, try a variety of related terms, etc…).
  • Pretend that you know what you’re doing. I love this tactic. Sometimes I know that I don’t know what I’m doing, but I don’t know what I don’t know, so I just start working until I get stuck in order to figure out where the problem is. It’s a really great way to pinpoint exactly what you don’t know.
  • Use sites that were created for these situations, like Lynda.com. If you’re a Carleton student, you already have a subscription! Even if you can’t find a video to explain exactly what you’re supposed to be doing, it can help you to get a hang of the general terminology relating to the task at hand or the basic functionality of a tool you’re learning to use.
  • Look for existing examples. Chances are you’re not the first person to do anything, so it’s a great idea to find examples of best practices and conventions. This is true for pretty much anything, but particularly when you’re doing something totally new.

Of course, the best part about not knowing how to do something is that you get to learn how to do it and then a week later when one of your colleagues doesn’t know how to do the same thing you get to pretend that you’ve known it all along and teach them how to do it! Such is the cycle of life. Remember, everyone’s just trying to fake it ‘til they make it.