All things Bede

As of this moment, I’ve been a member of the Digital Humanities team for seven sometimes challenging, frequently exhilarating and always rewarding weeks. I’ve learned a whole lot – from how to write good documentation to using tools like Omeka and ArcGIS to valuable cultural lessons such as being introduced to the 60’s Batman show.

I spent a good portion of my time this term focusing on the Bede Project which aims at creating an online commentary to the Ecclesiastical History of the English People by Venerable Bede. Three Carleton professors – Rob Hardy, Austin Mason, and Bill North – are collaborating on this project. Once finished, it is going to be part of Dickinson College Commentaries. I started working on this project over a year ago and since then have grown fond of Bede and his clear if occasionally funky Medieval Latin.

This term I’ve been focusing on two aspects of the project – vocabulary lemmatization and mapping. Lemmatization is a fancy word for mapping every inflected word form to its dictionary form, or lemma. Most of it was done automatically using a lemmatizer script, so what was left for Bard and me to do was to fill in the words for which the lemma for some reason wasn’t found. That would happen either when the inflected form was ambiguous, in which case I went back to Bede’s text to figure out which of the umpteen possible things it meant, or because the word wasn’t found in the word list the lemmatizer pulled data from (that would be true for Medieval Latin vocabulary, names, or words that had an alternative spelling). While slightly monotonous, this is a great refresher for my rusty Latin, and there’s a fun problem-solving aspect to figuring out which of the many possible meanings a word has in any given context.

The other part of the project I was focusing on is collecting all the data necessary for creating an interactive map of Bede’s England. I created a spreadsheet with a list of all the places mentioned in Bede using Plumber’s index of place names and found coordinates of the corresponding modern places. This process had its own challenges: sometimes it would not be clear where a place mentioned by Bede was located. When that was the case, I engaged in extensive googling and searching through various commentaries to Bede’s text hoping to find a note on the corresponding modern location (sometimes the name mentioned in Bede and the modern English name of the place don’t sound at all alike – for instance, Verulamium is now called St. Alban’s). After that I verified the coordinates of each of the places and added links to Pleiades and/or PastScape for the locations that have an excavated medieval site. The spreadsheet was then uploaded to ArcGIS, resulting in the following map (pretty cool, right?):

The next step I will be focusing on is adding a layer with all the rivers.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>