Tutee or Not Tutee: Who should be on camera in your Instructional Video?

Effective instructional videos can vary in style.  This short video, inspired by an Arizona State University study, reveals preferences and effectiveness in two different styles:

  1. Should you teach to the camera/viewer or
  2. Should you teach a student who is also on camera and film that interaction?

This video featuring Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru succinctly recaps a 2018 study from ASU’s Katelyn M Cooper, Lu Ding, Michelle Stephens, Michelene T. H. Chi, and Sara E Brownell.

Facing Instructional Videos

How important is it for instructors to include their own faces when creating instructional videos? The answer might surprise you. Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru (and an actor, director, and inventor of the Little Prompter) leans on research and his own expertise to offer guidance.

Business Video Benefits (in Education)

Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media and Design Guru provides an overview of Matt Bowman’s article in Forbes Magazine about video marketing in business. There is a reason businesses are using more video:  it’s working. It can work well in education, too. Take a moment to reflect on Matt’s article — and nibble on the possibilities video can provide educators by watching this:

Hello! What’s New in AT Social Media

Welcome! If you’ve been following this blog, you may notice things look a little different. We’ve updated to a brighter, friendlier theme with some features that help this site serve as a better resource. If you are just finding this blog for the first time: great timing! We’re glad to have you join us.

At the top of the main page, you’ll see a set of six “featured” posts. These will rotate pretty regularly, but always contain useful or pertinent information beyond our normal posts. Below the featured posts are our standard posts, filled with articles on useful technology, pedagogical musings, interesting projects, features on the team, and more.

Screenshot of blog

Each post, in addition to its content, will have a set of “tags” off to the left of the post. If you’re interested in a particular topic that is tagged, you can click on a tag and see all posts related to that topic. There is also a search box near the top to help you find posts as well.

 

Screenshot of blog post

 

This blog is just one component of our greater social media presence. We’re active on our Facebook page, our Twitter account, and we recently added an Instagram account. Connect with us on one or all, and let us know what you want to see or learn about.

The 3 C’s of Online Content Curration

By Dann Hurlbert

Social media has resulted a continued barrage of social spamming–re-posting millions of perceived “noteworthy” images/videos/links/stories and sharing of billions of m
undane daily thoughts and routines—arguably a waste of time for those involved on either side of the post.  Out of courtesy, a good curator carefully selects what content will aPhoto Courtesy of ClckrFreeVectorImages ctually benefit those who encounter it—rather than re-posting arbitrarily.    J-P De Clerck of i-scoop.eu defines content curation better than anyone:  “Content curation is about aggregating/discovering/gathering relevant content and then sharing or presenting it to audiences in a targeted and optimized way.”  One thing (among many things) his article Content Curation: Overview, Benefits, Goals, and Tools discusses is that a curator’s goals should be “to become a trusted filter and source of valuable and relevant information.”  I couldn’t agree more.

One way to visualize smart curation is using Harold Jarch PKM framework of Seek>Sense>Share, which he wrote about in a recent Social Media Today post.  Jarch outlined that “sharing is not as important as knowing [what and] when to share.”  He expands by saying that “sharing can confirm or accelerate our knowledge,” but “little should be shared if there has been no value added.”

I propose that each individual develops criteria that guides his/her decisions about what things are worthy of being re-posted.  Pawan Deshpande wrote an article entitled Content Curation & Fair Use:  5 Rules to being an Ethical Content Curator for contentcurration.com that gave five generic rules for content curation.  To model the change I’d like to see in the world, I decided to sum up Deshpande’s, Jarch’s, and De Clerck’s articles even more tightly.

Introducing The 3 C’s of Content Curation:

1)    Be Concise:  Use only the content you need to make your point.

2)    Be Considerate:  give credit to the creator of that content.

3)    Be the Connection:  provide links to the original work.

Using these 3 C’s, we can avoid becoming social spammers by actively and courteously curating and sharing [valuable–and only valuable–] information.

–Dann Hurlbert, Media & Design Specialist

 

Photo Courtesy of ClckrFreeVectorImages