Tutee or Not Tutee: Who should be on camera in your Instructional Video?

Effective instructional videos can vary in style.  This short video, inspired by an Arizona State University study, reveals preferences and effectiveness in two different styles:

  1. Should you teach to the camera/viewer or
  2. Should you teach a student who is also on camera and film that interaction?

This video featuring Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru succinctly recaps a 2018 study from ASU’s Katelyn M Cooper, Lu Ding, Michelle Stephens, Michelene T. H. Chi, and Sara E Brownell.

Facing Instructional Videos

How important is it for instructors to include their own faces when creating instructional videos? The answer might surprise you. Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru (and an actor, director, and inventor of the Little Prompter) leans on research and his own expertise to offer guidance.

Instructional Video Workshops Fill up Fast!

I’m already excited to be a part of the team hosting this Instructional Video Workshop at Carleton in late July!  Attendees will not only take-way a concrete and replicable process for creating process, but they’ll create [at least] 3 Instructional Videos they can start using right away.  The seats filled-up so fast, there is no doubt we’ll be doing more of these in the future!  More information on the workshop itself is available here.  And if you’d like to be notified when we host another one, please complete this short form. — dann


The Goodness of a Gimbal

Sunflowers and Osmo in Carleton's Arboretum Prairie

There are lots of things to consider when buying a video camera.  Sensors, color chips, resolution, recording formats, inputs/outputs, price-points and lots and lots more.  Until the recent explosion of drones, smooth camera movement has usually required peripheral hardware such as sliders, booms, dollies, and glidecams.  Enter the gimbal–that little mechanism that allows for smooth motion around a central axis.
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Course Tools

A swiss army knife contains the essential tools. What essential tools will you use in your course?

Instructors have more tools at their fingertips than ever before.  Sometimes the hardest (but most important) thing we can do for our students and our sanity is to . . . to limit ourselves.  Before starting a new course, consider creating a list of the tools you’ll be using regularly as part of your instruction.  Below is a sample list that might be used in a standard course. Items in [brackets] indicate a viable alternative tool instructor.
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Video Assessment Tools

7 Things Interactive Tools
Video is an excellent way to communicate—but, watching video is a passive activity. Since learning occurs best through engagement . . . finding a way to make your videos more engaging is essential. Here’s a great article from Penn State on Interactive Video Assessment Tools. Take a read, then challenge yourself to couple any video you show in class with an associated engaging activity.

 

Closed-Captioning Comparisons

Closed_captioning_logo

I’m currently evaluating Closed-Captioning Services for our in-house instructional videos.  Previously, closed-captioning has been done intermittently by individual instructors or staff.  For ADA compliance, and as a courtesy, we’ll be captioning videos from here on out.
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The 3 C’s of Online Content Curration

By Dann Hurlbert

Social media has resulted a continued barrage of social spamming–re-posting millions of perceived “noteworthy” images/videos/links/stories and sharing of billions of m
undane daily thoughts and routines—arguably a waste of time for those involved on either side of the post.  Out of courtesy, a good curator carefully selects what content will aPhoto Courtesy of ClckrFreeVectorImages ctually benefit those who encounter it—rather than re-posting arbitrarily.    J-P De Clerck of i-scoop.eu defines content curation better than anyone:  “Content curation is about aggregating/discovering/gathering relevant content and then sharing or presenting it to audiences in a targeted and optimized way.”  One thing (among many things) his article Content Curation: Overview, Benefits, Goals, and Tools discusses is that a curator’s goals should be “to become a trusted filter and source of valuable and relevant information.”  I couldn’t agree more.

One way to visualize smart curation is using Harold Jarch PKM framework of Seek>Sense>Share, which he wrote about in a recent Social Media Today post.  Jarch outlined that “sharing is not as important as knowing [what and] when to share.”  He expands by saying that “sharing can confirm or accelerate our knowledge,” but “little should be shared if there has been no value added.”

I propose that each individual develops criteria that guides his/her decisions about what things are worthy of being re-posted.  Pawan Deshpande wrote an article entitled Content Curation & Fair Use:  5 Rules to being an Ethical Content Curator for contentcurration.com that gave five generic rules for content curation.  To model the change I’d like to see in the world, I decided to sum up Deshpande’s, Jarch’s, and De Clerck’s articles even more tightly.

Introducing The 3 C’s of Content Curation:

1)    Be Concise:  Use only the content you need to make your point.

2)    Be Considerate:  give credit to the creator of that content.

3)    Be the Connection:  provide links to the original work.

Using these 3 C’s, we can avoid becoming social spammers by actively and courteously curating and sharing [valuable–and only valuable–] information.

–Dann Hurlbert, Media & Design Specialist

 

Photo Courtesy of ClckrFreeVectorImages