Tutee or Not Tutee: Who should be on camera in your Instructional Video?

Effective instructional videos can vary in style.  This short video, inspired by an Arizona State University study, reveals preferences and effectiveness in two different styles:

  1. Should you teach to the camera/viewer or
  2. Should you teach a student who is also on camera and film that interaction?

This video featuring Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru succinctly recaps a 2018 study from ASU’s Katelyn M Cooper, Lu Ding, Michelle Stephens, Michelene T. H. Chi, and Sara E Brownell.

Facing Instructional Videos

How important is it for instructors to include their own faces when creating instructional videos? The answer might surprise you. Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru (and an actor, director, and inventor of the Little Prompter) leans on research and his own expertise to offer guidance.

Instructional Video Workshops Fill up Fast!

I’m already excited to be a part of the team hosting this Instructional Video Workshop at Carleton in late July!  Attendees will not only take-way a concrete and replicable process for creating process, but they’ll create [at least] 3 Instructional Videos they can start using right away.  The seats filled-up so fast, there is no doubt we’ll be doing more of these in the future!  More information on the workshop itself is available here.  And if you’d like to be notified when we host another one, please complete this short form. — dann


Business Video Benefits (in Education)

Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media and Design Guru provides an overview of Matt Bowman’s article in Forbes Magazine about video marketing in business. There is a reason businesses are using more video:  it’s working. It can work well in education, too. Take a moment to reflect on Matt’s article — and nibble on the possibilities video can provide educators by watching this:

The Goodness of a Gimbal

Sunflowers and Osmo in Carleton's Arboretum Prairie

There are lots of things to consider when buying a video camera.  Sensors, color chips, resolution, recording formats, inputs/outputs, price-points and lots and lots more.  Until the recent explosion of drones, smooth camera movement has usually required peripheral hardware such as sliders, booms, dollies, and glidecams.  Enter the gimbal–that little mechanism that allows for smooth motion around a central axis.
Continue reading The Goodness of a Gimbal

Video Assessment Tools

7 Things Interactive Tools
Video is an excellent way to communicate—but, watching video is a passive activity. Since learning occurs best through engagement . . . finding a way to make your videos more engaging is essential. Here’s a great article from Penn State on Interactive Video Assessment Tools. Take a read, then challenge yourself to couple any video you show in class with an associated engaging activity.

 

Grant Winner Introductory Videos

By Dann Hurlbert & Eric Mistry

Our faculty delve into a variety of unique projects, often aided by internal grants. This fall, we produced a series of introductory videos for any grant winners who were interested. It can be a challenge bringing an engaging thirty minute interview into an introductory video of approximately two minutes, so we have to carefully pull only the most relevant pieces of information while maintaining the personalities of our interesting subjects. Every project is slightly different, and that’s what makes each one a fun challenge.

Here’s a sampling of our work from this project. Enjoy, and let us know what you’d like to see more of!

All videos can be found here, or you can click on the embedded videos below.