Tutee or Not Tutee: Who should be on camera in your Instructional Video?

Effective instructional videos can vary in style.  This short video, inspired by an Arizona State University study, reveals preferences and effectiveness in two different styles:

  1. Should you teach to the camera/viewer or
  2. Should you teach a student who is also on camera and film that interaction?

This video featuring Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru succinctly recaps a 2018 study from ASU’s Katelyn M Cooper, Lu Ding, Michelle Stephens, Michelene T. H. Chi, and Sara E Brownell.

Facing Instructional Videos

How important is it for instructors to include their own faces when creating instructional videos? The answer might surprise you. Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru (and an actor, director, and inventor of the Little Prompter) leans on research and his own expertise to offer guidance.

Instructional Video Workshops Fill up Fast!

I’m already excited to be a part of the team hosting this Instructional Video Workshop at Carleton in late July!  Attendees will not only take-way a concrete and replicable process for creating process, but they’ll create [at least] 3 Instructional Videos they can start using right away.  The seats filled-up so fast, there is no doubt we’ll be doing more of these in the future!  More information on the workshop itself is available here.  And if you’d like to be notified when we host another one, please complete this short form. — dann


Business Video Benefits (in Education)

Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media and Design Guru provides an overview of Matt Bowman’s article in Forbes Magazine about video marketing in business. There is a reason businesses are using more video:  it’s working. It can work well in education, too. Take a moment to reflect on Matt’s article — and nibble on the possibilities video can provide educators by watching this:

Tips for Getting Started with Online Teaching

Even for schools that don’t see themselves as “online” institutions, there are ways to gradually get started teaching online courses. In this video, Dann Hurlbert of Carleton College’s Academic Technology walks viewers through some research on and tips for getting started.

Special Thanks to Yiwen Lou for her work on this video.

I Just Know…

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A recent Science Post satirical article titled, “I just know” replaces systematic reviews at the top of the evidence pyramid, is a pretty funny read with a darker side.

While the article focuses on medical science (“There is no science backing up my claim that the homeopathic pill cured their cold, but in my gut I just know it did.”) it got me thinking about the teaching and learning work we do here at Carleton and our levels of evidence.

What evidence–beyond “I just know”–do we accept for what we have done in Carleton courses or for what we hoped to have done? If evidence more robust than “I just know” was available for our teaching and learning endeavors, would we want to gather it? What if it was easily available? Any instructional technology we use at Carleton can help with the collection of evidence. And with thoughtful design, that collection of evidence can be “easy” while still being meaningful.

Continue reading I Just Know…

Tech Training Goes Online

I have been training faculty to use technology since 1999, and boy have things changed since that time!  When I started, technology was hard to use, difficult to master and only vaguely helpful to teaching most of the time.  But that didn’t stop a lot of people, because there was also a lot of value … as long as it all worked just as it was supposed to!

Over the years, technology has come a long, LONG way. We are now living in very exciting times, indeed! I’m always excited to share with faculty the new features and tools that are already available to them on campus.  But I always run into a similar problem: No time. Continue reading Tech Training Goes Online