Tutee or Not Tutee: Who should be on camera in your Instructional Video?

Effective instructional videos can vary in style.  This short video, inspired by an Arizona State University study, reveals preferences and effectiveness in two different styles:

  1. Should you teach to the camera/viewer or
  2. Should you teach a student who is also on camera and film that interaction?

This video featuring Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Guru succinctly recaps a 2018 study from ASU’s Katelyn M Cooper, Lu Ding, Michelle Stephens, Michelene T. H. Chi, and Sara E Brownell.

Instructional Video Workshops Fill up Fast!

I’m already excited to be a part of the team hosting this Instructional Video Workshop at Carleton in late July!  Attendees will not only take-way a concrete and replicable process for creating process, but they’ll create [at least] 3 Instructional Videos they can start using right away.  The seats filled-up so fast, there is no doubt we’ll be doing more of these in the future!  More information on the workshop itself is available here.  And if you’d like to be notified when we host another one, please complete this short form. — dann


Clicker Assessment Summary: 2016-2018

vintage voting machine with dials and labels for democrat and republicanSUMMARY

Academic Technology has conducted short assessments of in-class clicker use across several 100 level courses in the sciences and social sciences in both the 2016-17 and 2017-18 academic years. For all courses surveyed, the students agreed that clickers made class more engaging by helping them participate more openly, increase their attention in class, think more deeply about their answer, and hone their critical thinking skills. Here are a few more details:

Continue reading Clicker Assessment Summary: 2016-2018

I Just Know…

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A recent Science Post satirical article titled, “I just know” replaces systematic reviews at the top of the evidence pyramid, is a pretty funny read with a darker side.

While the article focuses on medical science (“There is no science backing up my claim that the homeopathic pill cured their cold, but in my gut I just know it did.”) it got me thinking about the teaching and learning work we do here at Carleton and our levels of evidence.

What evidence–beyond “I just know”–do we accept for what we have done in Carleton courses or for what we hoped to have done? If evidence more robust than “I just know” was available for our teaching and learning endeavors, would we want to gather it? What if it was easily available? Any instructional technology we use at Carleton can help with the collection of evidence. And with thoughtful design, that collection of evidence can be “easy” while still being meaningful.

Continue reading I Just Know…