The 3 C’s of Online Content Curration

By Dann Hurlbert

Social media has resulted a continued barrage of social spamming–re-posting millions of perceived “noteworthy” images/videos/links/stories and sharing of billions of m
undane daily thoughts and routines—arguably a waste of time for those involved on either side of the post.  Out of courtesy, a good curator carefully selects what content will aPhoto Courtesy of ClckrFreeVectorImages ctually benefit those who encounter it—rather than re-posting arbitrarily.    J-P De Clerck of i-scoop.eu defines content curation better than anyone:  “Content curation is about aggregating/discovering/gathering relevant content and then sharing or presenting it to audiences in a targeted and optimized way.”  One thing (among many things) his article Content Curation: Overview, Benefits, Goals, and Tools discusses is that a curator’s goals should be “to become a trusted filter and source of valuable and relevant information.”  I couldn’t agree more.

One way to visualize smart curation is using Harold Jarch PKM framework of Seek>Sense>Share, which he wrote about in a recent Social Media Today post.  Jarch outlined that “sharing is not as important as knowing [what and] when to share.”  He expands by saying that “sharing can confirm or accelerate our knowledge,” but “little should be shared if there has been no value added.”

I propose that each individual develops criteria that guides his/her decisions about what things are worthy of being re-posted.  Pawan Deshpande wrote an article entitled Content Curation & Fair Use:  5 Rules to being an Ethical Content Curator for contentcurration.com that gave five generic rules for content curation.  To model the change I’d like to see in the world, I decided to sum up Deshpande’s, Jarch’s, and De Clerck’s articles even more tightly.

Introducing The 3 C’s of Content Curation:

1)    Be Concise:  Use only the content you need to make your point.

2)    Be Considerate:  give credit to the creator of that content.

3)    Be the Connection:  provide links to the original work.

Using these 3 C’s, we can avoid becoming social spammers by actively and courteously curating and sharing [valuable–and only valuable–] information.

–Dann Hurlbert, Media & Design Specialist

 

Photo Courtesy of ClckrFreeVectorImages

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Dann Hurlbert

Media & Design Specialist at Carleton College
Dann Hurlbert is Carleton College's Media & Design Specialist, and he works directly with faculty to develop effective instructional videos and to evaluate associated learning and video effectiveness. Dann also supervises 30 students and manages Carleton's campus Event Video Production. Prior to Carleton, Dann spent 15 years teaching video production and theatre and worked as a professional actor and director — appearing in 50+ television commercials and nearly that many stage productions. His MFA thesis included producing an instructional video entitled How to Write and Produce Your Own High School Musical, which is currently being distributed through Films Media Group. He’s got a certificate in online teaching through UW Stout and has loads of experience as both a face-to-face and online instructor. He also designed and manufactured the Little Prompter, a personal teleprompter that helps educators easily create and flawlessly delivery their own video content. The LP2 is now available on Amazon and littleprompter.com You'll often hear Dann advocate for the use of video . . . but only when it's both engaging and developed with assessment in mind.

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